On sound and fear

Sound is often understood as generally having a privileged role in the production and modulation of fear, activating instinctive responses, triggering an evolutionary functional nervousness.
The power of sound to instill dread was well known to the heavily outnumbered Maroons, the tribal nation turned guerrilla fighters who claimed a number of astounding victories in their asymmetric conflict with the English colonialists in Jamaica during the
late eighteenth century.
The abeng, a fashioned cow horn, had two uses: by slave holders to call the slaves to the cane fields and a “traditional form of communication among the communities, warning them and sending messages across difficult terrain.”

The Maroons used the  abeng in tandem with their other special techniques—drum communication, the ambush, and camouflage—in order to outwit the British: “They embedded themselves in leaves and vines and melted into the surrounding bushes. The
British repeatedly walked into clearings where their surroundings would suddenly come
alive and close in on them.”

The abeng, as a system of communication, produced signals “reproducing the pitch and rhythmic patterns of a fairly small vocabulary of Twi words, from their mother language, in most cases called Kromantin (Maroon spelling) after the Ghanaian port from which many slave ancestors were shipped.”

Sentries stationed outside the villages would  use the different pitches to communicate the British approach, the extent of the weapons they carried, and their path. But the abeng also had another affective function: to scare the British with its “hideous and terrible” dislocated tones, sometimes managing to repel the invaders with sound itself. Gradually, as the British learned to assign a cause to its shrieking, high- pitched sound, their terror of Maroon ambush only intensified.

Found in 1738: Bad Vibrations, from:
SONIC WARFARE Sound, Affect, and the Ecology of Fear, by Steve Goodman.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 2010.

AI 5G by 2020

5G network is the talk of electric globe.
According to Ericsson, “By 2024, 5G is expected to cover more than 40% of the world’s population.
5G promise a lot of things:
“Basically, …to provide a real wireless world…the year 2020 will bring a revolutionary change in the field of Communication system where everybody is connected from anywhere, at any time.
You hear about Internet of Things (IoT).
“It is a hyper-connected computing environment that builds on the following: (1) Broadband wireless internet connectivity; (2) Miniaturised sensors built into everyday objects; and (3) Collaborative robots (Cobots), supported by AI and machine learning, interpreting the Big Data collected by the sensors.”

IoT will be run by artificial intelligence (AI).
Ericsson reports that “More than half of service providers – a total of 53 percent – expect to have adopted AI within their networks by the end of 2020. Some are working to an even shorter timescale, and expect to have adopted AI by the end of this year. A further 19 percent are looking at an adoption timescale of within 3 to 5 years.”
According to IOT ANALYTICS, this AI will take over control in transportation, industry , health care and security.
However, before your smart car drives you trough smart city rolling your smart spliffs, hear about what comes up ugly in all of this:
Surveillance state using smart weapons autonomous killing systems to replace you with robot work force bringing on Terminator’s Judgment Day Skynet.

On Ciphers and Korans

sdd
Found in ThugGods : spiritual darkness and hip-hop by Melvin Gibbs , from:
Everything but the burden : what white people are taking from Black culture
Author: Greg Tate
Publisher: New York : Harlem Moon/Broadway Books, 2003.