Higher Learning

ON RASTA ART

” “Art.” By “art” is meant the ability to perceive the things of God and to be sensitively aware of the sacred in life; it is a man’s inherent ability to see through the apparent to the real, to separate the false from the true, and to discern the good; but not only this. It is also, and essentially, the power of communicating knowledge, and a knowledge which is basically neither the learning from books nor sheer doctrine, but a mystical experience. Elders of the movement say that they will only accept a man with this “art.” “Not every man with a beard is a Rasta- man-We take a man with art. ” In a sense, also, “art” means the art of understanding the minds of other men. This is something inborn, which cannot be acquired by study and good works if it is not already there, but which can be sharpened by discussion with right- minded people and by ritual observance. A man may discover it in himself after living the major part of his life in dis- solute unawareness. It was there all the time, but he did not know it. The more men can learn about themselves and their natures the more they can draw out this skill and develop it. When a man is expounding doctrine movingly, or praising God in powerful fashion, his listeners call out “Art I Art I Mighty art I Ja Rastafari I” Nothing can make up for the absence of art. In the words of one Rasta informant, “Some have all the zeal of God, but not the knowledge.”

Found in Doctrine,  from: Protest and Mysticisim: The Rastafari Cult of Jamaica

Author: Sheila Kitzinger
Source: Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Vol. 8, No. 2 (Autumn, 1969)

Image source: http://www.islandoutpost.com

 

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Higher Learning

ABSTRACT SOUNDS AND SYMPATHETIC ABSTRACT IMAGES IN CARTOON MUSIC

ABSTRACT CARTOON MUSIC.jpg

From

Film Music: A Neglected Art by Roy M. Pendergast, 1992.

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Higher Learning

VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY OF BAYE FALL – MURALS OF CHEIKH AHMADOU BAMBA

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dUb

hannahlisa.

Since the birth of subcultures, music has played as much of a role in defining them as the clothes and views people have chosen have. Musical influence was diverse and widespread, sounds from Jamaica and the Caribbean fuelled the all night ska and reggae dances of the 1980’s whilst British bands such as The Beatles opened up the hearts and minds of the tie dye, trippy happy hippies of the 1960’s.

Before sound systems or even electricity had been invented, music has been utilised to bring people together, to celebrate and to convey messages. Before subcultures even existed, music played a key role in society and was enjoyed by both the rich and poor.

Whilst the era of rock n roll was causing girls to faint and guys to invest in Brylcream, thousands of miles away in the ghettos of Kingston, Sound system culture was starting to cause vibrations. At the…

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From Kingston to Camden: Britain’s long lasting affinity for Sound system culture.

Aside
Dub Disinfo Department, Higher Learning

PETAR MLAKAR ON GOD

AM: You write a great deal about God. How do you see God?

PM: God is God. The absolute of the absolute. Pure transcendence. Beyond Nothing and Being. Yes, even Nothing is after him. He is before it, but not in a sense of Being. Everything is inside, under or above Him. For Him we cannot say whether things are or are not. Once I wrote: ‘Because infinitively more of this, that Earth is round, is God God.’ Neither any fact of experience, nor any science can give us anything more truthful than this, that God is God. This is an extreme, radical term; more accurately, Non-term in Non-world with No-life and Non-logic.

From 3am Interview: ART AND POLITICS – AN INTERVIEW WITH PETER MLAKAR OF THE NSK

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dUb, Magu Shan Dub Tong

FAKIN LUNATIK ART

FAKIN LUNATIK Check out Fakin Lunatik
online!
CROP ARTS

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