The Sound of Bed-Stuy

Short docu on sound system movements out of New York. Bigup!

A Journey into Reggae from Dub to Dancehall with Ras Jammy

Original Ras Jammy selection on My Analog Journal with just under 50 minutes of finest roots rock reggae and dubwise. 100% vinyl with crackle, hum and nuff warmth.

Haris Pilton meets Joseph Cotton – Mr Classic

Privileged to listen to some early mixes in the making of this master piece, Jah Billah confirms this album opens up a new chapter for Balkan regggae.

Mr. Pilton says:



After two years brand new reggae album is here.

HARIS PILTON meets legendary JOSEPH COTTON aka JAH WALTON on an album called MR CLASSIC. The album includes 14 songs in an old fashion reggae style.

Enjoy

From press release:

MR CLASSIC is the latest album from Joseph Cotton in collaboration with producer Haris Pilton.

Legend Joseph Cotton aka Jah Walton (born Silbert Walton, 1957, St. Ann, Jamaica) is a reggae deejay and singer active since the mid-1970s. He recorded his first song named “Gourmandizer” with Joe Gibbs in 1976, under the name Jah Walton. He then moved to Harry Mudie owner of Moodisc label, recording popular tracks such as “Stay A Yard And Praise God” and “Touch Her Where She Want It Most” (the title track from his debut album).

In the mid-1980s he began recording under the name Joseph Cotton, immediately having success. He reached No.1 in the UK charts with “No Touch The Style”, leading to a television appearance on Channel 4’s Club Mixprogramme in 1987. Several more reggae chart hits followed in the form of “Things Running Slow”, “Pat Ha Fe Cook”, “Tutoring”, “Judge Cotton”, and “What Is This”.

Cotton continued to perform and record into the 1990s, 2000s and the present day. He now lives in France where he performs at venues throughout the country and elsewhere in Europe both solo and in collaboration with other reggae artists

Wosui – Wicked Babylon EP

Wosui coming in hot on future dubwise label Reggaewise outta Greece.

3 tracks+1 dub made primarily and foremost with task to shake the scoops and rumble the tweeters of any good sound system.
Full support!

Feldub & Earl Sixteeen – Stand Firm

Heavyweight stepper riddim with flying horns in combination with soulful rasta lyrics by legendary Earl Sixteen followed by dubwise cut.
Full support!

O.B.F. – Lava

Fresh from Dub Quake label here comes another set of heavyweight sound system scorchers from unstoppable O.B.F. crew.

General Two x Doctor Heba – Bosanski Lonac

Doctor Heba outa Dub & Roll records crew teams up with legendary underground rapper General Two to produce original dub rap album Bosanski Lonac.
Yes you hear that right. This is not dub-hop or mashup remix style music but original dubwise riddims produced specially for General Two lyrics and mixed live in session.

Entire album mix is filmed and live dubwise action shown without any cuts or edits documenting this unique release.



Favourite track:
Dole u Bosni




Download and support:

Ob.dub – Singular Colors

ODGProd label releases one after another future dub albums. Check out Ob.dub coming in with enough ethereal melodies, breakbeats, rootical vocals, hot bass and proper skanks.

Ob.dub – Singular Colors

On reggae and hip-hop

DJ Kool Herc: ‘When I extended the break, people were ecstatic, because that was the best part of the record to dance to.’

DJ Kool Herc, the chief architect of hip-hop, was born Clive Campbell in Kingston, Jamaica. At the age of twelve, in the winter of 1967, Campbell moved to Bronx, New York. The year he migrated to America, sound-system culture in Jamaica had a ubiquitous presence in Kingston’s lower-class neighbourhoods.
As a twelve-year-old preteen now living in the Bronx, Campbell already possessed a persistent reggae and sound-system consciousness having experienced the innovative music of
Prince Buster, the Skatalites, Don Drummond, and dancehall deejay U-Roy.

At eighteen, Campbell attempted to recreate the Jamaican dancehall experience in the Bronx by spinning the latest Jamaican reggae records at neighbourhood parties, but his young African-American audience was not feeling the reggae beat and did not comprehend the Jamaican patois rhymes of sound-system MCs known as toasters.
As DJ Kool Herc, Campbell shifted to playing funk records, but his reggae background caused him to favour funk with heavy-weight bass lines and lively percussive drumming. Kool Herc’s record selections were transmitted through hi-fi stereo equipment that spoke with the same awesome power and sonic quality of a roots Jamaican sound system.
The selector, as a deejay is called on a reggae sound system, though using one turntable-the norm during the ’60s and ’70s- was still capable of altering the arrangement of a tune spinning off a record on the turntable platter. The selector skillfully inflicted a completely different sound context on a roots reggae recording by manipulating the controls on the sound system’s amplifier to briefly remove the bass on a tune, accentuate the singing of the song’s vocalist, and highlight the harmony of trumpet, saxophone, and trombone. The selector would create tension in a live remix by bringing back the bass booming like a compact implosion.
By the ’70s, the selector had the ability to vary the sonic texture of the recording by creatively deploying reverb and echo chamber to repeat the sweetest elements of a vocal or horn solo and as a special sound effect that dramatized certain aspects of the recording with a live feel.

American Electronic Music Owes It All to People of Color



Kool Herc’s approach to creating something fresh from pre ­recorded funk on vinyl was different because he used two turnta­bles. But his approach was similar in that he shared the same objec­tive as the selector, which was to do a live remix of the record to heighten the entertainment of his audience. He extended the intox­icating rhythmic feel of percussive conga, bongo, or trap drums sizzling the break of records like Mandrill’s “Fencewalk,” the Incredible Bongo Band’s “Apache,” and the live version of James Brown’s “Give It Up, Turn It Loose” by playing the same record on two turntables using a sound mixer to seamlessly prolong the per­cussive breakbeats.

Herc pioneered the innovative use of two turntables and a sound mixer as active instruments that became more than passive facilitators, more than just pieces of electronic equipment that merely played what was recorded on vinyl.

Invention Hot Spot: Birth of Hip-Hop in the Bronx, New York, in the 1970s


These electronic instruments were now used to rearrange pre­recorded music to suit the immediate needs of the disco and the dance floor. When DJ Kool Herc rocked a block party, dispatching African­ American funk with the overwhelming sonic power of a reggae sound system, no other deejay dared to compete.

Kool Herc’s party flyer



Text from:
Dubwise : reasoning from the reggae underground
Chapter: Raggamuffin Rap: The Interconnections of Reggae and Hip-Hop
Author:
Klive Walker, 2005.

Digitron Sound meets Haris Pilton – Not Granted riddim

Heavyweight combination with Hornsman Coyote brass section, Digitron steppas and Haris Pilton flavor and styles results in 11 track mixes including Dubolik dub and vocals by Tadiman, MC Lipin, Jahmadeus and Berise.
Nah miss!

Anja G. & Dr. Obi – Moonlight

Another roller from AmpliFyah label – catch the last 7″ dubplate vinyl preorder or bag the digital highgrade from BandCamp.

This one coming with specially heavy dubwise.

Bademah feat Tenor Youthman – Blood A Run Remixed

Eleven remixes in different styles ranging from deep dubstep to heavy dubwise cuts of sold out Tenor Youthman and Bademah 7″ tune “Blood A Run”.
Witness the versatility of world wide band of wicked versionists each ramping up original sounds into unique and fresh blends.
Cover art by Amar Zahiragić.
From release notes:

Tenor Youthman and Bademah made a song called Blood A Run that we released on vinyl 7″ on our label in 300 copies that is sold out long time ago and original song and dub were limited to those 300 copies. Message of this release needs to be heard so we decided to do a remixed digital release that will be available on all streaming platforms. Producers and artists on this release are from Canada, Russia, Sweden, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Croatia, Slovenia and Serbia united to send a message of peace and a positive vibrations of Dub music to the world.
Its free for grabs until we run out of free DL slots.
Mastered by DUBSALON SKYLAB STUDIO 11 TROPICS and Doktor Heba @ Buna River Studios Mostar