Babylon Report, dUb, Higher Learning

On influence and term DUB

King Tubby’s studio

The term ‘dub’ is now used widely and indiscriminately by producers of dance and ambient music.
More particularly, as the British post-punk producer Adrian Sherwood has commented, ‘everything from hiphop to techno and every other form of music right now has stolen ideas off dub, or incorporated those ideas’.

While there is obvious hyperbole here, the point is nevertheless an important one.
The influence of dub permeates much contemporary electronica, dance, and urban music.
Indeed, there is an increasingly wide range of contemporary music that is explicitly and conspicuously indebted to dub, from the dance-oriented rock of a band like Death in Vegas to the indigenous Moroccan music of Aisha Kandisha’s Jarring Effects, and from the relatively recent work of Primal Scream back to the punk and post-punk music of bands such as The Clash, PIL, Terrorists, Killing Joke, Bad Brains, and even the Welsh-speaking Anhrefn, some of whose album BWRW CWRW (1989) was mixed by the British dub pioneer the Mad Professor.

King Tubby – Playing the mixing desk

The term ‘dub’ evolved out of earlier terminology used in the recording industry in the United States.

This is significant because we will see that the genre has remained fundamentally related to recording technology. Traditionally known as ‘black wax’, ‘soft wax’, ‘slate’ or ‘reference disc’—and in the manufacturing sector as an ‘acetate’—the dub plate was a metal plate with a fine coating of vinyl.

Recorded music would be pressed on to the dub plate, following which a ‘stamper’ or metal master disc would be created in order to produce quantities of vinyl records. The process of transferring the music on to the vinyl-coated metal plate was known as ‘dubbing’—just as adding sound to a film is also known as dubbing. Hence, the terms ‘dub’ and ‘dub plate’ are not solely allied to the genre of ‘dub’.
However, the point is that, with the demand for exclusive, unreleased music in Jamaican sound system culture (in which sound systems competed for audiences by, amongst other things, playing new music), the trade in ‘pre-release’ dub plates grew.
And it is within this culture, hungry for new sounds and ideas, that the genre of ‘dub’ emerged.

The Untamed Imagination of Lee “Scratch” Perry
A Brief History of The Studio As An Instrument: Part 3 – Echoes From The Future


The term dub, in the sense of a musical genre, was, therefore, originally applied to a remixing technique pioneered by Jamaican engineers and producers who were seeking novel and exclusive music (i.e. ‘specials’) for sound system use.
So successful was the technique that it quickly evolved as a relatively inexpensive and creative way of reusing rhythm tracks. Essentially, recording engineers produced tracks on which their efforts were often more evident than those of the original musicians.

Indeed, the mixing desk and even the recording studio itself came to be understood as a musical instrument in that, in a similar way to a jazz musician’s improvisation on a standard tune, the engineer is involved in the reconceptualization of a piece of music.
However, this is a very different type of instrument, in that, as a remixing technique, it is alchemical in its effects. As Jonathon Tankel puts it, ‘remixing is recoding, the reanimation of familiar music by the creation of new sonic textures for different sonic contexts…
The remix recording creates a new artefact from the schemata of previously recorded music.

It is prima facie evidence of [Walter] Benjamin’s contention that
“to an ever greater degree the work of art reproduced becomes the work of art designed for reproducibility” .

Text from:

King Tubby meets the Upsetter at the grass roots of dub: Some thoughts on the early history and influence of dub reggae

Christopher Partridge, 2008.
Popular Music History

Standard
Dub Disinfo Department

Banana Zvuk feat. Popay, Chakka & Žan – Legaliziraj Remixes EP

Gwan over to PDV Bandcamp and pick up Legaliziraj Remixes EP.

Standard
Dub Disinfo Department

Banana Zvuk feat. Popay & Chakka & Žan Jakopač – Legaliziraj + Remixes

Check out video premiere and special edition of 8 remixes in 7″ format out on PDV records.
Big tune Legaliziraj by Banana Zvuk gets remixed by Grabber, Marcus G, Roots In Session, Rumbling Banana, Dr. Obi, Fokus, Verandabeatz and Jah Billah.
Look out!

Standard
dUb

Bademah feat Tenor Youthman – Blood A Run Remixed

Eleven remixes in different styles ranging from deep dubstep to heavy dubwise cuts of sold out Tenor Youthman and Bademah 7″ tune “Blood A Run”.
Witness the versatility of world wide band of wicked versionists each ramping up original sounds into unique and fresh blends.
Cover art by Amar Zahiragić.
From release notes:

Tenor Youthman and Bademah made a song called Blood A Run that we released on vinyl 7″ on our label in 300 copies that is sold out long time ago and original song and dub were limited to those 300 copies. Message of this release needs to be heard so we decided to do a remixed digital release that will be available on all streaming platforms. Producers and artists on this release are from Canada, Russia, Sweden, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Croatia, Slovenia and Serbia united to send a message of peace and a positive vibrations of Dub music to the world.
Its free for grabs until we run out of free DL slots.
Mastered by DUBSALON SKYLAB STUDIO 11 TROPICS and Doktor Heba @ Buna River Studios Mostar

Standard
Dub Disinfo Department

Preecha Kungo, High Pressure Sound System, Red Dread –

Trod Along Remix EP

Still remember that day when two larger than large acapellas were dropped trough the long gone but never forgotten Versionist. com. Who dat?

It was man I-self Kungo Preecha pon the case. These were recorded for my good man Rob Conelly aka Irish Moss as you can hear in the intro.

“Trod Along” comes with conscious lyrics with Kungo’s impeccable DeeJay style followed with female backup harmonies haunting along. Since a zillion versions came trough, but not in a while, so here comes Ruffa Roots label with two vocal cuts+riddim versions making a nice EP produced by High Pressure Soundsystem and Red Dread.

Digital rock yo all.

Dedication to each and every one!

Standard
Dub Disinfo Department

Subactive feat. Speng Bond – Pepper Dem – Sub Alpine Remix

Standard
Uncategorized

Benny Page – Turn Down The Lights – LsDirty Bootleg

Jah Billah says: bootleg of a remix is good for you.

It’s truly incredible how far can reggae sample go on.
I remember running a dubstep/jungle refix of this classic Benny Page tune. Now hear this raggatek version by @lsdirty!
Cause it’s friday, you aint got nothing better to do…but bun Babylon!
#LsDirty #Bootleg
#Benny Page #TurnDownTheLights

Standard
dUb

Shelly Thunder – Kuff – Sub Alpine Remix

Here comes another Kuff remix, this time directed by mighty Sub Albine kitchen.
Catch it!

Standard
dUb

Hempress Sativa – Rock It Ina Dance – Filip Motovunski Remix

Standard
dUb

Mighty Mystik – Cali Green – Jamie Bostron Remix

Out on Totally Dubwise Recs here come Jamie Bostron drumnbass refix of Mighty Mystik – Cali Green.

 

Standard