On reggae and hip-hop

DJ Kool Herc: ‘When I extended the break, people were ecstatic, because that was the best part of the record to dance to.’

DJ Kool Herc, the chief architect of hip-hop, was born Clive Campbell in Kingston, Jamaica. At the age of twelve, in the winter of 1967, Campbell moved to Bronx, New York. The year he migrated to America, sound-system culture in Jamaica had a ubiquitous presence in Kingston’s lower-class neighbourhoods.
As a twelve-year-old preteen now living in the Bronx, Campbell already possessed a persistent reggae and sound-system consciousness having experienced the innovative music of
Prince Buster, the Skatalites, Don Drummond, and dancehall deejay U-Roy.

At eighteen, Campbell attempted to recreate the Jamaican dancehall experience in the Bronx by spinning the latest Jamaican reggae records at neighbourhood parties, but his young African-American audience was not feeling the reggae beat and did not comprehend the Jamaican patois rhymes of sound-system MCs known as toasters.
As DJ Kool Herc, Campbell shifted to playing funk records, but his reggae background caused him to favour funk with heavy-weight bass lines and lively percussive drumming. Kool Herc’s record selections were transmitted through hi-fi stereo equipment that spoke with the same awesome power and sonic quality of a roots Jamaican sound system.
The selector, as a deejay is called on a reggae sound system, though using one turntable-the norm during the ’60s and ’70s- was still capable of altering the arrangement of a tune spinning off a record on the turntable platter. The selector skillfully inflicted a completely different sound context on a roots reggae recording by manipulating the controls on the sound system’s amplifier to briefly remove the bass on a tune, accentuate the singing of the song’s vocalist, and highlight the harmony of trumpet, saxophone, and trombone. The selector would create tension in a live remix by bringing back the bass booming like a compact implosion.
By the ’70s, the selector had the ability to vary the sonic texture of the recording by creatively deploying reverb and echo chamber to repeat the sweetest elements of a vocal or horn solo and as a special sound effect that dramatized certain aspects of the recording with a live feel.

American Electronic Music Owes It All to People of Color



Kool Herc’s approach to creating something fresh from pre ­recorded funk on vinyl was different because he used two turnta­bles. But his approach was similar in that he shared the same objec­tive as the selector, which was to do a live remix of the record to heighten the entertainment of his audience. He extended the intox­icating rhythmic feel of percussive conga, bongo, or trap drums sizzling the break of records like Mandrill’s “Fencewalk,” the Incredible Bongo Band’s “Apache,” and the live version of James Brown’s “Give It Up, Turn It Loose” by playing the same record on two turntables using a sound mixer to seamlessly prolong the per­cussive breakbeats.

Herc pioneered the innovative use of two turntables and a sound mixer as active instruments that became more than passive facilitators, more than just pieces of electronic equipment that merely played what was recorded on vinyl.

Invention Hot Spot: Birth of Hip-Hop in the Bronx, New York, in the 1970s


These electronic instruments were now used to rearrange pre­recorded music to suit the immediate needs of the disco and the dance floor. When DJ Kool Herc rocked a block party, dispatching African­ American funk with the overwhelming sonic power of a reggae sound system, no other deejay dared to compete.

Kool Herc’s party flyer



Text from:
Dubwise : reasoning from the reggae underground
Chapter: Raggamuffin Rap: The Interconnections of Reggae and Hip-Hop
Author:
Klive Walker, 2005.

Dub London – Bassline of a City

Great video about dub experience in London along with Museum of London exhibition (closed September 2021) featuring such items as original Channel One sound stacks.

Stranjah – Tips & Tricks

Stranjah channel coming in with nuff “how to” videos on drum and bass sound design.
Featuring both shorts and in depth step by step subject exploration, as well as guest producers shining trough, Stranjah is putting in hard works into making your workflow better.

Secret Archives of the Vatican – Barsoom

If you never ear about Secret Archives of the Vatican, best guess is that you never used “ethnic”, “esoteric” and “eclectic” in the same sentence.
The Sleeper Has Awakened!

NICE UP! Records – 12 Dubs Of Xmas Volume 2

“Tis the season to be jolly once again…”

MONODREAD – SATTA FATWA DUB

MSDT 013 JAH BILLAH FT IYANO IYANTI – CHASE BABYLON – CABALLO REMIXES

MSDT 013 CHASE BABYLON (CABALLO REMIXES)

1.CHASE BABYLON (CABALLO ZOUK BASS REMIX) 02:21
2.CHASE BABYLON (CABALLO REMIX) 03:28

http://www.junodownload.com/products/jah-b…es/2650598-02/

MSDT 013

Brand new Magu Shan Dub Tong release featuring tropical bass specialist and latino resiste founder Caballo.
Caballo remixes Chase Babylon in hardcore future dancehall versions: short but sweet zouk bass remix and a bit heavier 3014 style remix.
Caballo is a producer, MC, and an editor for Mad Decent and Tropical Bass.

Caballo SoundCloud

DR. DAS ON POLITICS OF DUB BASS

Describe the politics you feel are inherent in dub bass.

It relates to the general attitude which states that bassists are just there to do a job and hold down the rhythm, whereas vocalists and guitarists are the ones responsible for serious expression. To me, the bass has always been just as emotive as any other instrument. Dub music proves that’s so because it represents an inversion of clichéd perspectives about bass. With dub, the bass line is the hook of the song and the guitar is often there backing it up. The bass line also offers a low frequency melody that carries the key emotional content. The challenge in being a dub bassist though is you’ve got to do all of that using as few notes as possible. However, your brief is the same as it is for any other instrument—ensuring how you feel about the world is reflected back into your playing.

From Dr. Das – The politics of dub bass
by Anil Prasad 2007.

POWERSOFT WALL OF BASS

WALL OF BASS

MAJOR LAZER – JAH NO PARTIAL ( JSTAR REMIX)

JAH SCREECHY – WALK & SKANK – JAH BILLAH REMIX

original producer: BLACKER DREAD.
original vocalist: JAH SCREECHY.
authorized remix: JAH BILLAH.
analog mastering: BALANCE .

OUT NOW ON JUNO DOWNLOAD:

www.junodownload.com/