dUb, Higher Learning, Kaneh Bosm

On world turning Rasta and getting high without getting high

Jah Bilah intro:

This examination of the rise of Rastafari in mainstream following popular conversion of Snoop Dogg to Snoop Lion back in 2013 contains some reasoning by UK bredrin Benjamin Zephaniah and Maxi Priest.

“Regarding the body as a temple, which must be loved, respected and well looked after, is another Rastafarian mantra. And contrary to popular belief, not all Rastafarians smoke marijuana, and if they do, they don’t simply smoke to get high.

However, this happens today within the context of an ever-increasing amount of anti-smoking campaigns highlighting the negative effects smoking has on the body, which are being taken more seriously now and are much more chronicled and echoed from the rooftops.


The reasons Rastas give up smoking marijuana are the same reasons why tobacco users kick the habit. Although there are many Rastafarians who still smoke, others, especially those who follow a stringent orthodox lifestyle, advise smokers to respect their body.

Most people think all Rastafarians smoke marijuana, but I don’t smoke because I view my body as a temple,” says Zephaniah, who lectures at Brunel University.

I came to the conclusion that I didn’t need ganja to get high and I didn’t like the habit I developed. So I have been getting high from not being high for the last 30 years.

Agreeing, Priest adds: “You get one chance to live and you must learn to preserve it so that you can live a longer life with meaning, caring and understanding. 

“I had a heart attack, and even before the heart attack, I wanted to stop smoking. But when I had the heart attack – that made me realise how precious and delicate my temple is.

“The biggest myth about Rastafarians in terms of stereotypes is weed, but you don’t have to smoke weed. There is more to the understanding and the faith of being a Rastafarian than just weed.”

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Yogi Dread

YOGI SITARA

The yogis have ‘visualized’ the internal functional structure of a human body as a sitara.
The sitara depicted in the hands of Goddess Saraswati symbolizes its spiritual importance. It implies that Goddess Saraswati – the divine power of discerning and righteous intelligence appears in the subtle body, which has the structure similar to that of a sitara. The sitara in the subtle body of a human being consists of the ‘wires’ of the Ida, Pingala and Susumna Nadis that conjugate on one end in the coil of Kundalini, which is lying dormant in the Muladhara Cakra. The Sat Cakras are different points where this sitara is striken by the prana to produce specific swaras of the eternal music of Omkara.

From:

Music – The Nectar of Life by Pt. SHRIRAM SHARMA ACHARYA

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