Higher Learning, Yogi Dread

On the path to wisdom

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Higher Learning

Tummo: Fierce Lady of Yogic Heat

Great presentation on breathwork practices and Tummo tradition of yogic culture by Michael Sheehy, research assistant professor in Tibetan and Buddhist studies and the director of scholarship at the Contemplative Sciences Center at the University of Virginia.

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Higher Learning, Yogi Dread

Yoga Nejang Demonstration by Dr Nida

Yoga Nejang demonstration by Dr. Nida shows 24 easy and accessible exercise that can be done as daily regime of healthy body practice.
As you go trough 24 points mindfully checking up on your body from outside with palm touch and from inside with breath presence, you connect with ancient tradition coming from Traditional Tibetan Medicine.
This Yoga Nejang comes from Kalachakra tradition and is a unique blend of Self-massage and Tibetan yoga. I highly recommend it.

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Higher Learning, Yogi Dread

The Women’s Meditation Tradition in Tibet

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Higher Learning, Yogi Dread

The Yogis of Tibet (2002)

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Higher Learning, Yogi Dread

Tibetan Yoga – wit dr. Ian Baker and dr. Nida Chenagtsang

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Higher Learning, Yogi Dread

On Tantric Traditions and Haṭhayoga with James Mallinson

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dUb, Kaneh Bosm

On Human Evolution

Humanity Evolved with Cannabis

Sea squirts are marine organisms that shared a common ancestor with vertebrates (animals, reptiles, birds, fish, etc.) 55 million years ago. These primitive animals have a precursor to the human heart. And they have an endocannabinoid system, producing naturally occurring cannabinoids like other animals. According to NORML, “By comparing the genetics of cannabinoid receptors in different species, scientists estimate that the endocannabinoid system evolved in primitive animals over 600 million years ago.”

Mind-altering plant and fungal medicines grow in every habitable place on earth. Chimps eat over a dozen species of plants for medicinal purposes. Large groups of them have been known to walk long distances to get to these medicinal plants, which scientists later discovered do things like kill parasites, fungi, and viruses. In fact, whole classes of compounds for human use have been formulated as a direct result of watching our wild cousins. Evidence from all over the world shows animals in the wild using psychoactive plants and mushrooms.

Early humans would naturally observe and learn from the animals around them, and, being animals themselves, would also be drawn to various forms of plant medicine. Modern anthropologists studying hunter-gatherer tribes found that they have an encyclopedic knowledge of local flora and fauna. The fungi, plants, and animals that they formed a special connection with were integrated into primitive spiritual rituals, rituals that would later evolve into yoga, for example.

Cannabis is known to be one of humanity’s earliest agricultural crops, having evolved between 6 and 34 million years ago. The exact time and place of first contact is still debated: some scientists point toward central Asia and others identify Europe during the last Ice Age. The herb entered the archaeological record of Asia and eastern Europe at about the same time, between about 12,500 and 10,000 years ago. A recent review of cannabis archaeological data links an intensification of cannabis use in East Asia with the rise of transcontinental trade at the dawn of the Bronze Age, about 5,000 years ago.

Humans used both nonpsychoactive hemp and the more medicinal cannabis version of the plant for a variety of reasons. Perhaps it was first used for food, as it was for other animals, then as medicine, and later as an intoxicant to enter an altered state as part of spiritual rituals. At some point we began making rope and textiles from its fiber, and those ropes may have been instrumental in the domestication of the horse.

Charred seeds have been found inside the burial mounds dating back to 3,000 BCE, and the oldest cannabis archaeological relic in existence is a piece of hemp cloth from 10,000 years ago.

Found in: Chapter 4. THE HISTORY OF CANNABIS AND YOGA, from:

Ganja Yoga: A Practical Guide to Conscious Relaxation, Soothing Pain Relief, and Enlightened Self-Discovery , by Dee Dussault, 2017.

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dUb, Higher Learning, Yogi Dread

Dubwise Yoga

I need you to know that Dub Yoga is a real thing. Tonight in Berlin you can join selektress Sister Julie from Roots Daughters sound and yogini Regina Sebald for a unique experience:
DUBwise YOGA 
“We use the music as a tool in exploring our body through yoga and the healing sounds of dub.”
Our prophecy of Yogi Dread is slowly but surely coming to fulfillment.  With Ganja Yoga in Canada, Dubwise Yoga in Germany, outernational Jah9 movements all amass and rally Yogi Dread army globally.
Peace, love and unity shall conquer.
I had a conversation about this not a year ago with a beautiful yogini that moved forward to pure lands. I dedicate this post to you Kate.

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Yogi Dread

YOGA – TRADITION IN THE EYES OF MODERNITY

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